Real Greek Yoghurt

A spoonful of rich tradition

If you’ve ever dipped your yoghurt spoon in the creamy delight known as real Greek yoghurt, the taste sensations are tantalizing. Protein-rich and an excellent source of calcium, Greek yoghurt is both delicious and nutritious offering many health benefits. This amazing superfood not only has a taste of its own but a classic history to match. The cuisine of ancient Greece included oxygala, a dairy product and form of yoghurt in 5th Century Greece enjoyed with honey. There are even ancient references, as far as India, describing yoghurt as ‘food of the gods.’  Word travels, then and now.

Today, Greek yoghurt has gained international fame for its excellent quality and is one of the Greek products with largest volume of exports. What’s the secret to the food enjoyment of authentic Greek  yoghurt known for rich consistency and distinct taste.? Yoghurt is actually fermented milk.   Traditionally, Greeks made yoghurt from sheep’s milk, although cow’s milk is popular today and a mixture of both can also be used. The slightly tart taste is caused by the conversion of the lactose in the milk to lactic acid. Yoghurt is an all natural dairy product and regardless of choice of animal milk, the traditional Greek straining process filters the liquid removing excess water, whey and lactose.  By straining the yoghurt, the texture becomes creamier and creates a distinctive flavor by filtering the sodium and sugar contained in the whey (the watery part of milk).  Straining is a time honored Greek tradition originating in a historically agricultural society where animals were kept for milk and the homemaker’s pride. Yoghurt is a daily staple food in the Greek diet and, even today, the largest producers refer to family recipes.

You will enjoy the refreshing taste of authentic Greek yoghurt, a certified product, in the Greek Breakfast experience as a standalone topped with honey or fresh fruit or as an ingredient in a variety of yoghurt-based regional breakfast delicacies.

 

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